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Review: Superior #2

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Posted by: Chris Bushley, Assistant Managing Editor
created 11/21/2010 - 1:52pm, updated 11/22/2010 - 1:23am

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Superior # 2 PREVIEW WRITER/CREATOR:  Mark Millar PENCILS/CREATOR:  Leinil Yu INKER:  Gerry Alanguilan COLORS:  Sunny Cho LETTERS:  VC's Clayton Cowles COVER:  Leinil Yu and Gerry Alanguilan PUBLISHER:  ICON (MARVEL) RELEASE DATE:  November 17, 2010    A new hero has been introduced to the Millarworld and he is Superior to the rest!  The character of Simon Pooni, a.k.a Superior, is something that I never thought I would see from the likes of Mr. Millar. He is a character that has been broken down by the onset of multiple sclerosis but has not been defeated, much like the real life heroes that struggle with the disease every day. This teenage boy not only has to deal with his own body betraying him but the fact his friends have left him by the wayside as well. All except his best friend and former teammate Chris, together these two have formed a bond that nothing can separate.  One night Simon is startled by the sudden appearance of an alien space monkey in his room that grants him a wish. Simon transforms into Superior, his favorite movie and comic hero, and is told he will learn why he was chosen to have his wish granted in one week. Simon is then left alone in his room, screaming for his parents but then realizes he is stuck looking like Superior and jumps out his window. Issue two begins with Simon climbing in the window of an extremely scared Chris and we are treated to a book that brings back so many childhood memories of attempted super heroics that I have ever read. This book is not the normal action driven, in your face chaos that is expected from Mr. Millar, but rather a look at two friends trying to deal with an extraordinary situation the only way two teenage boys know how -- testing out all the superpowers you could possibly imagine! And it makes for a fun filled treat that is usually not showcased in todays market. Millar really flexes is writing skills in a way that he hasn't shown before and it pays off for both himself and the readers.  The richness of characters and the pure innocent fun this book encompasses has made it a favorite of mine and I am sure it will become one of yours too. I only wish Millar refrained from using his patented vulgarity in this book, it somehow seems forced and lessons the impact of the story. But it will not keep me from picking up every issue that Millar and crew place upon the shelves. Hang on for a fun read that will bring back memories of wearing blankets as capes and running around the back yard! Great job!

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