Review: Farscape #19


For more months than 2011 has had so far, Farscape told the story of the War for the Uncharted Territories as an enigmatic alien race known as the Kkore invade known space. For the most part, the series has been continuously good during this time. The storyline is culimation of a year’s worth of development over the course of two different Farscape-related series, the main ongoing and the Scorpius solo series, and many of those plot points have been resolved or look to be before the end of this arc.

Last issue was mostly spent elaborating, perhaps laboring, over the friction between the various races and groups that newly-christened Peacekeeper Commandant Aeryn Sun has gathered in an attempt to put up a unified resistance against the Kkore. Ultimately, the potential friction fizzled out and I found myself wondering why it took up so much of the book only to end so anticlimactically.

In the current issue, we have returned to a more action-oriented sequence. It felt a little rushed, as if too much was being crammed into the pages while not quite spending enough time on anything. While this didn’t ruin the story entirely, it did feel somewhat like flipping the channels without waiting to see what was on.

I enjoyed seeing Scorpius and Rygel’s attempts at engaging the Delvians, a race who have withdrawn from the affairs of the galaxy and whom Scorpius suspects to have ties to the Kkore, and wished we could have seen a bit more of that sequence. I can only hope we’ll return it to next issue.

My greatest issue with this book, however, was the art. Normally Will Sliney is a perfectly capable artist, but much of this book seemed rushed and not up to his usual standards. Recycling of art, static poses and slightly off-model characters show up throughout. As with the story, I can only hope that these things are corrected from the next issue.

This was not the best issue of this series, but it was also far from the worst. As I have been enjoying the “War for the Uncharted Territories” so far, I will gladly give the creative team the benefit of the doubt.